Listed below are projects that are offered on a statewide basis to youth enrolling in 4-H clubs in Montana. Statewide projects are under the priority initiatives of Science, Citizenship and Healthy Living and divided into project categories.

Some counties offer projects in addition to those listed here. These projects are usually set up to meet a specific need within the county 4-H program. If you are interested in these kinds of projects, contact your county’s MSU Extension Office to find out more about them. Many projects also have opportunities for sharing and learning about your unique skills and talents through project achievement programs. Contact your Extension Office to find out how to meet these goals.

Download the 4-H Clover-Project Selection Guide for complete project descriptions and requirements.

SCIENCE

  

Animal Science

Beef
Cat
Dairy Cattle
Dairy Goat
Dog
General Animal Science
Horse
Horseless Horse
Meat Goat
Pocket Pets
Poultry
Rabbit
Sheep
Swine
Veterinary Science



Engineering and Technology

Aerospace
Electricity
Robotics
Small Engines
Woodworking

Environmental & Natural Sciences

Entomology
Forestry
Outdoor Adventure
Shooting Sports
Sport Fishing
Wildlife
Wind Energy

Family and Consumer Sciences

Babysitting
Child Development
Family Adventures
Home Environment
Knitting/Crochet/Embroidery
Quilting
Ready to Wear
Sewing and Textiles

Plant Sciences

Crop Science
Gardening
Range Science Management
Weed Science

CITIZENSHIP

Communication & Expressive Arts

Communications
Cowboy Poetry
Leathercraft
Photography
Theater Arts
Visual Arts
Scrapbooking

 

Leadership & Personal Development

Citizenship
Leadership
Service Learning

HEALTHY LIVING

  

Health

Cake Decorating
Foods and Nutrition

Other Projects

Cloverbuds
Exploring 4-H

Support Materials

4-H Member Records
4-H Club Materials
4-H Leader Materials
Judging

4-H PRIORITY INITIATIVES

Science


For more than 100 years, 4-H has been a part of local communities trying new and innovative techniques to improve their quality of living. 4-H, with its connection to land-grant universities, has the ability to develop America’s future generation of scientists and engineers. In 4-H, youth use a rich and diverse set of research-based curricula and activities that provide hands-on, real-world experiences delivered in both informal and formal settings. Delivered through the 4-H program, science curriculum offers an extraordinary range of engaging and challenging activities for youth of all ages and abilities. Some examples include: Robotics, Animal Quality Assurance and Veterinary Science. 

Citizenship


Since its inception, 4-H has placed emphasis on the importance of young people being engaged, well-informed citizens. By connecting to their communities and leaders, youth understand their role in civic affairs and are able to expand their role in decision-making processes. It’s clear that civic engagement provides the foundation that helps youth understand the “big picture” of life and learn the skill sets that allow them to become wise leaders for the 21st century. Citizenship Seminar,service learning and international programs are just a few of the many opportunities to learn about and contribute to our global society.

 Healthy Living


A core belief of 4-H is health, as evidenced by the four H’s in the 4-H clover: Head, Heart, Hands, and Health. 4-H is committed to the physical, mental and emotional health of our nation’s youth so they may lead healthy and productive lives as youth and into adulthood. 4-H has become a national leader in health-related educational issues including chemical health, mental and emotional health, foods and nutrition, physical health and safety. Examples include Cooking 1-4 and Party Planning.

4-H Membership/Age Requirement

  •  Any youth who is 5 years old on Oct. 1 may join a 4-H Cloverbud group.
  • Cloverbuds is a non-competitive educational program for youth ages 5 to 8 years of age and is the ONLY project they can enroll in.
  • Youth age 8 on Oct. 1 may join a regular 4-H club as a full member who can enroll in several different projects. Given the differing maturity and ability of youth this age, a family may choose to have their child continue in a Cloverbud group even though s/he will turn 8 during the coming year. If a youth turns 19 years of age prior to the beginning of the program year (Oct. 1), s/he is not eligible to re-enroll in 4-H unless still in high school.
  • Individuals older than 18 years of age who have special needs are eligible to participate in 4-H provided they are still enrolled in high school.
  • 4-H membership is open to all eligible youth. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Montana State University and Montana State University Extension prohibit discrimination in all of their programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation, and marital and family status.
  • In recognition of the educational and developmental needs of youth, a general guideline is listed below to help determine which level of projects a youth might be enrolled in based on age.

Classifications                Age Range
Cloverbuds                       5 to 7 years old
Junior/ Intermediate          8 to 13 years old
Senior                              14 to 19 years old

Youth who are 19 must be enrolled in high school to participate in 4-H.